Top 10 Biggest WWE Flops

Discussion in 'General WWE' started by Roadster, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. Once again, i'm new so i'm not sure if this has been a thread, well lets begin our Top 10 Biggest WWE Flops.
    ATTENTION, this is based off my opinion and will edit at a rightful suggestion.

    Number 10....Marc Mero: A fresh WCW star was brought up formerly as Johnny B. Badd a rip off the song Johnny B. Good. When he was brought up to WWE he was perceived as the next star but when he was injured in 1997 his wife Sable (now ex-wife) surpassed Mero's popularity and by the time Mero returned Steve Austin had taken his rumored spot. He was taken off TV in October 1998 and he was released with his wife in July 1999

    Number 9....ECW One Night Stand 2006: Don't get me wrong this was an OK show but this show was more of an ECW vs WWE storyline with a lot of the classic ECW stars gone like Mike Awesome, Lance Storm, Taka (i think) but this show compared to the 2005 show was worse and the main event was screwy as RVD as hot as he was and as a rising WWE star he won after an interference, remember kids, Cena should fight in Iraq because where he's hated he almost always wins!

    Number 8....WWF Lightweight Title: This title was made in response to the high popularity of lucha libre style of wrestling, though WWF brought in the WWF Lightweights WCW counterpart, the WCW Cruiser-weight title, the damage was done and the title was unified with the WCW counterpart starting the slow demise of good lightweight wrestling in WWE.

    Number 7...WWF NWO: The NWO was as great as it could have been in 1996-1997 where the stable was getting popular but when the final demise happened in 2000 the stable was beginning to be missed so WWF responded 3 months after the WCW invasion ended, with the "POISON" little did people know that The Rock and Steve Austin played a role in Wrestlemania 18 and the rest of the NWO's short life in the WWF-WWE. The stable was ended after Kevin Nash tore his quad the week prior.

    Number 6...WrestleMania Xi: This Mania that took place in the WWE's hometown Hartford, Connecticut. but the only thing people remember is the long list of reasons it sucked! Diesel vs Shawn Michaels had a botch in the end with the worse Jackknife i had seen at the time *cough* The Giant cough* the main event being Lawrence Taylor vs Bam Bam Biglelow, even though LT soled his part it was a far stretch from being better than WM X or WM 12, did i mention this Mania had the most guest appearances than any other. so it wasn't all bad.

    Number 5...Once in a Lifetime: Wrestlemania 28 in my opinion was far better than Wrestlemania 29 mainly because of the great matches and build up for matches. John Cena vs The Rock was the headline it sold merch and had it's own documentary! the Wrestlemania 28 match was fresh and a decent contest. fast forward exactly 1 year and 6 days later the same match happened with the WWE title on the line and the exact same thing happened during the match but with a Super Cena coming out on top, Twice in a Lifetime

    Number 4....Fake Diesel and Razor Ramon: This was a mockery of WWF ship jumpers Scott Hall formerly known as Razor Ramon and Kevin Nash formerly known as Diesel, in September 1996 Jim Ross announced the return of the Bad Guy and Big Dady Cool, Diesel. Well Glenn Jacobs and Rick Bogner showed up and despite having a title shot at In Your House: It's Time they had no success. Bogner left the company and Glenn Jacobs returned 9 months later as the Undertaker's brother, Their last appearance was at the Royal Rumble 1997 where "Diesel" was the last legal man to be eliminated.

    Number 3...Vader: Vader was brought in as a Monster who took no one's orders and even ran through Gorilla Monsoon. His popularity and his reputation soared through the roof until. SUMMER SLAM 1996, this event saw Shawn Michaels beat the monster Vader cleanly! his last title match was some where in 1997 possibly at In Your House: Final Four. He went on to 1998 as a jobber, after losing his mask to Kane he went onto call himself a "Big Fat Piece of Shit"


    Number 2...Blue Blazer: This was a complete joke that cost WWE millions of dollars as well as Owen Hart's life, planned as a rip on WCW star Sting, it became nothing but something of a joke of a serious competitor in Owen Hart, who stayed after Bret, Davey, and Jim departed in 1997 after the screwjob, he was put in ridiculous gimmicks and other things but the Blue Blazer was as idiotic as the booker of Wrestlemania 2000.

    Before we get to number 1 here on some honorable mentions,
    Wrestlemania 2000
    John Cena over Brock Lesnar, Extreme Rules 2012
    John Cena vs Big Johnny
    Ron Simmons WCW Title reign

    Number 1: The Invasion: The Invasion consisted of One WCW main eventer and the rest were WCW jobbers and lower mid-carders, first thought to be a great idea it became a flop as soon as no recognizable WCW stars were involved, This was obviously showing WWF loyalist that "See they never had anything to offer" even though Stone Cold and Kurt Angle joined the stable consisting of RVD from ECW was just as bad as WCW Nitro 2000 episodes!
     
  2. Hard to argue with most of these tbh, Johny B Badd shouldn't be on this list though he's not that big a bust. I'd argue Goldberg is more of a bust from his WWE run as an example.
     
  3. Got it, i will change that
     
  4. No need to change it lol, the OP is your opinion man.
     
  5. #3 Vader was on Boy Meets World couldn't have been too big of a flop :p just kidding haha
     
  6. #6 Lockard 23, Jan 9, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
    Can't disagree with the Invasion being #1. I never cared to see a cross-promotional angle personally, but objectively, if handled right this had the potential to be the biggest money-drawing angle of all time. But they dropped the ball big time with the talent they had and made it into just another McMahon storyline and hardly did anything past the Invasion PPV to make the Alliance look like a credible threat. To be fair, it wasn't entirely their fault as they originally had a much more complicated and elaborate plan to jump start the angle that Meltzer once wrote a pretty long article about, but for reasons beyond their control, it didn't pan out. Still...

    You can't really call Once In A Lifetime a flop since it did big business. The second match didn't draw as well but it was still a huge attraction, too.

    In regards to Vader... there's a difference between being a flop and the company not handling you right. A flop is someone who has potential to be big and who they push and desperately try to get over but despite efforts by the talent and/or bookers, it just fails (i.e. Sheamus and ADR.) Vader's problem was that he wasn't utilized correctly, for the reasons you stated.

    I can't really disagree with most of the others you said. I'd like to add a few of my own, though (though not sure if a couple of them would make the top ten.)

    Ultimate Warrior Being The Next Hulk Hogan - Yes, he was popular both before and after he defeated Hogan at WM6 and had the torch passed to him. And no, he wasn't really what you'd call a bad drawing champion. But he was literally meant to be the guy to permanently take over Hogan's spot and that failed miserably. Probably not entirely his fault when you closely examine things, but I do believe he just wasn't the same star as Hogan and was too eccentric for a lot of people.

    Scott Steiner, Test and Billy Gunn As Top Guys -

    1. Steiner came into a big ovation at Survivor Series 2002 and according to Jericho in his second book, Vince said they had big plans for Scotty. But his incredibly bad performances at the 2003 Rumble and No Way Out against Triple H (performances so bad that the audience turned on him and started booing him both times) pretty much killed that. I think the original plans could have even been a third HHH/Steiner match at WM19 that ended with Steiner finally claiming the belt but the previous two months caused the company to lose all faith in him as a main eventer. Shame, as he was a great talent and from what I hear would later put on some pretty good matches in TNA.

    2. Test was a talent the WWF always wanted to make into a main eventer. Linda McMahon even mentioned in a couple of conference calls that he was one of their main talents that they wanted to build into a feature headliner. But despite booking him against The Rock and Shane McMahon in 1999, he never got past midcard level. They even decided to cancel a possible feud between him and HHH late in that year. They started to semi-push him in early 2003 but gave up on him again.

    3. Billy Gunn won the 1999 King Of The Ring, cost The Rock a big match against Triple H and even feuded with The Great One at Summerslam that year but he just didn't have the charisma to make it to a top level. Road Dogg was always the more charismatic and better speaker of the two when they were the New Age Outlaws, as most have probably noticed.